Posts in Category: Trips

Flatiron HDR

This is the same shot as <a href=”https://eleventwentysix.com/index.php?showimage=338″>this B&W photo</a>. First time trying out HDR. Not a big fan of HDR but I can see where it would be beneficial sometimes.

Râşnov Fortress

The good ‘ole days when all you had to worry about was being raped and pillaged by your neighbors.

In Râsnov, Romania a citadel was built around the year 1215 by the Teutonic Knights and it was mentioned for the first time in 1331. The citadel was conquered only once in its history, around the year 1600 by Gabriel Báthory.

There is a myth attached to Râşnov Fortress. During a particularly long siege of the fortress, the citizens of Râşnov were concerned about the lack of available fresh drinking water. Two Turkish soldiers, having been captured earlier, were put to the task of digging a well in the center of the fortress. These two men were assured that they would be given their freedom once the well was completed. According to local legend, it took them 17 years to finish the well, but they were still killed afterward. This famous well still sits in the center of Râşnov Fortress, and is 143 meters deep.

Horseshoe Curve

Horseshoe Curve is a famous railroad curve near Altoona, Pennsylvania. It was built by the Pennsylvania Railroad during 1854 in Kittanning Gap at the summit of the Allegheny Front. The curve was built in response to the difficulty of constructing a railroad through the summit of the Allegheny Mountains. It was such an important location that it was guarded by Union soldiers during the American Civil War and the Nazis attempted to sabotage it in Operation Pastorius during World War II. The curve was designated as a National Historic Landmark in 1966, and is now a part of the National Register of Historic Places. Amtrak’s Pennsylvanian service uses this route from Pittsburgh to New York City.

Sedona, AZ

The red rocks of Sedona featuring Capitol Butte and Coffee Pot Rock, on the right side. This was taken from Airport Road overlooking the city. Single shot from 2006 with the Nikon D200, no tripod, F16, 29mm cropped. Beautiful day it was.

Flatiron

I found myself agape, admiring a skyscraper – the prow of the Flatiron Building, to be particular, ploughing up through the traffic of Broadway and Fifth Avenue in the late-afternoon light. – H.G. Wells (1906)

Kangaroo depression

“Just take your photo and leave me alone in my misery.”

He just looks so sad. If I was stuck in a zoo in Chicago, I would be sad too. Actually, they were hopping about like crazy. Just happened to take the photo at the right time.

Stephansdom, Wien, Austria

St. Stephen’s Cathedral is a must see while in Vienna. Every detail of this cathedral must be examined to truly appreciate the complexity of its architecture. From the colorful roof to the carvings on the exterior walls, you can spend an entire day and be mesmerized.

Although we did not have an entire day to spend here, this photo represents the majesty of the cathedral. It is very dark inside and taking pictures without flash is almost impossible. Holding the Nikon tightly on the nave gates and keeping the shutter open for 1/4 of a second without moving required several attempts. One visitor who was using a point and shoot camera was dismayed by his outcomes, and was even further saddened when he saw the results of my photos. I politely told him to take his camera off automatic and try shooting in manual mode. Who knows if he succeeded.

Crabtree Falls

On the way back from Charlotte, NC, we took the Blue Ridge Parkway for it’s beautiful views. Near milepost 339 is a stop to see Crabtree Falls. It is a 2.5 mile loop hike to view the falls, well worth the time. Even if you make the decision to take a shortcut on the trail and end up sliding 15 yards on your back and your camera gets covered in mud <wink>.

Sunset canoe

Canoers at East Fork State Park near Cincinnati over Labor Day weekend.

Morning on Chimney Rock

Chimney Rock State Park near Asheville, NC features a 315 foot granite monolith. The rock is accessible via elevator and provides stunning views of the nearby countryside. The park was privately owned until 2007, when the State of North Carolina purchased it from a family for $24 million. The park offers hiking trails for all skill levels, spectacular views, and a 404-foot waterfall, Hickory Nut Falls.